Page 34 - Port of Baltimore - January/February 2018
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“Our goal is economic development, growing the Port and making sure the way is paved for Jim White and the rest of the MDOT MPA employees to do their jobs as efficiently as possible and bring in new business,”
– Christian Dean, Chairman and CEO, BAM Brands USA
Christian Dean
CHRISTIAN DEAN,
Chairman and CEO, BAM Brands USA
For Christian Dean, port work is a family tradition. His grandparents met at a major port on the West Coast, where both were working. To this day, Dean’s uncle and brother work at that same hometown port.
“We have a very long history in the ports,” said Dean. “Then, when I was 18, I joined the U.S. Coast Guard and was stationed in Baltimore for most of my career.”
That history of experience at the Port of Baltimore, and with the business of running a port generally, is what made Dean an ideal candidate for Port Commissioner. “The people within
Gov. Hogan’s office of appointments knew of my background, and that’s how I became involved,” he said.
During his tenure as Port Commissioner, Dean is looking to help the Port expand and stay competitive. “Our goal is economic development, growing the Port and making sure the way is paved for Jim White and the rest of the MDOT MPA employees to do their jobs as efficiently as possible and bring in new business,” he said.
One of the challenges the Port faces,
according to Dean, is acquiring enough land to support its growth potential. “Our role [as Commissioners] is not to seek out the property to buy, but our role is to make sure that when Jim White brings us something and needs some kind of commitment, ... that we are all on board with the further expansion.”
The Port of Baltimore’s biggest strength, Dean believes, is its superior efficiency — “being the place where all these carriers want to come because of how quickly the workers can load and unload container ships. There’s
a competitive advantage with our efficiency rate and the ability that
we have to expand into the future.” Another major point in the Port’s favor is being able to accommodate the larger container ships coming through the Panama Canal, he said.
Dean, who until last summer was employed at First National Bank, is now CEO of his own business, an importer and distributor of two German makeup brands, Make up Factory and BeYu. The flexibility that comes with being his own boss, Dean said, has given him more time than ever before to focus on the needs of the Port community and how he can help fulfill them. “I don’t need to ask anybody’s permission,” he said.
Robert Huber joined the MDOT
MPA, then called the Maryland Port Authority, in 1970. Formerly a property and casualty underwriter, his primary responsibilities dealt with insurance requirements.
Throughout his tenure with the MDOT MPA, he worked in and managed many fields, such as insurance, leasing, safety, property management and land acquisition. Huber served as a member of the MDOT MPA’s tariff committee, which established property rental rates and supervised the leasing, marketing and management of the World Trade Center Baltimore. In his role, he helped bridge the gap between government requirements and business interests.
“Having spent almost 40 years with the Maryland Port Administration, I am very aware of the need to keep the Port strong and competitive,” said Huber, who received the Designation Award from the Building Owners and Managers Association International for his role as
a real property administrator. “As a Port Commissioner, I see many opportunities to accomplish this through maintaining
ROBERT HUBER,
Former Maryland Department of Transportation’s Maryland Port Administration Executive
[32] The Port of Baltimore ■ January/February 2018


































































































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